News & Exhibitions / Los Angeles

  • Announcing the 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees

    3/29/18

    New York, NY – Artadia is pleased to announce the Awardees for the 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awards: EJ Hill and Clarissa Tossin. As the 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees, Hill and Tossin will receive $10,000 in unrestricted funds as well as access to the ongoing benefits of the Artadia Awards program. Applications for the Awards were open to any visual artist living in Los Angeles County, for over two years, working in any medium and at any stage of their career. This is Artadia’s fourth year providing unrestricted Awards to artists in Los Angeles.

     

    In the first round of jurying, Derrick Adams, artist, Brooklyn, NY; Zoe Larkins, Assistant Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, CO; and Selene Preciado, Independent Curator, Los Angeles, CA., selected five Finalists: Susu Attar, EJ Hill, Andy Robert, Analia Saban, and Clarissa Tossin. Curator, Alma Ruiz, Senior Fellow, Sotheby’s Institute of Art – Los Angeles, joined Preciado for the second round of evaluations. The jurors conducted studio visits with each of the five Finalists to determine the Awardees.

     

    Of the process, Ruiz exclaimed, “Visiting with the finalists provided me an exceptional opportunity to learn about their work and to connect more directly with them. I feel confident that the award comes at a time in Hill and Tossin’s careers where it can play an essential role in their artistic development.”

     

    Preciado extolled the depth of each artist’s practice: “Departing from the utopian modernist project of Brasilia as a central topic, Clarissa Tossin has been producing poignantly critical work around modern architectural projects in Brazil and the rest of Latin America, and the historically complex relationship of these countries with the United States. Recently, she has been exploring a stronger and more direct dialogue with local modern architecture, more specifically in Los Angeles, weaving together her concerns on progress and utopia, language and translation, flow of economic powers, and representation and mis-representation.

     

    EJ Hill continues to evolve at a rate that is not only deeply rooted in intellectual concerns and in dialogue with history and art history, but also with ongoing social concerns. His most current body of work brings in the specificity of his personal experience underlining, for example, problems in our public school and higher education systems, imagining alternative histories and modes of knowledge transmission to question the shortcomings in our cultural makeup as a nation.” Ruiz continued, “Coincidentally, in the work we were exposed to, both artists use performance as a detonator of ideas that relate to either individual or ancient histories expressed in a clear voice through the form of ideo, sculpture, and installation.”

     

    Artadia is a national non-profit organization that supports artists with unrestricted, merit-based Awards followed by a lifetime of program opportunities. Artadia is unique in that it allows any artist to apply, engages nationally recognized curators to review work, and culminates in direct grants. Since 1999, Artadia has awarded over $3 million to more than 300 artists in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

     

    The 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awards are made possible thanks to the generosity of GRoW @ Annenberg, Allison and Larry Berg, Artadia’s Board of Directors, Council members, and many individual donors in Los Angeles and throughout the United States.

     

  • Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles Public Program with Magali Arriola

    2/28/18

    Magali Arriola, art critic and independent curator, presents a public program at The Mistake Room in Los Angeles on November 16, 2017.

    Magali Arriola is an art critic and independent curator currently living in Mexico City. She was curator at Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo between 2011 and 2014, where she organized exhibitions of artists such as James Lee Byars (co-curated with Peter Eleey and co-produced with MoMA-PS1), Guy de Cointet and Danh Vo, and curated shows contextualizing works from the Jumex Collection. She was Chief Curator of Museo Tamayo between2009 and 2011 where she curated exhibitions and projects with artists such as Roman Ondák, JoachimKoester, Claire Fontaine, Adrià Julia and Julio Morales. She was visiting curator at the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art in San Francisco in 2006 where she curated Prophets of Deceit. From 1998 to 2001 she was Chief Curator at the Museode Arte Carrillo Gil in Mexico City, where she worked with a generation of artists that include Eduardo Abaroa, Francis Alÿs, Miguel Calderon, Daniela Rossell and Pablo Vargas Lugo. Her independent projects include The Sweet Burnt Smell of History: The 8th Panama Biennial(2008); What once passed for a future, or The landscapes of the living dead (Art2102, Los Angeles, 2005); How to Learn to Love the Bomb and Stop Worrying about it (CANAIA, México City / Central de Arte at WTC, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2003-2004); Alibis (Mexican Cultural Institute, Paris /Witte de With, Rotterdam, 2002); Erógena (Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, Mexico City / SMAK/ Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent, 2000); Peter Greenaway, Painting and Artifice (Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, 1997). Arriola has extensively written for books, and catalogues and has contributed to publications such as Art Forum, Curare, Frieze, Mousse, Manifesta Journal, and The Exhibitionist, among others.

     

    The Mistake Room (TMR) dwells in the terrain of ideas and practices fueled by radical imagination. A constantly morphing cultural platform, TMR is shaped through ambitious multi-year thematic projects that expand the possibilities of what an independent art space can be and do. Working alongside artists, thinkers, and other makers, TMR summons new publics for art and ideas into being in ways that reflect the complexity of our world and time.

  • Announcing the 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Award Finalists

    2/26/18

    Artadia is pleased to announce the five Finalists for the 2018 Los Angeles Awards: Susu Attar, EJ Hill, Andy Robert, Analia Saban, and Clarissa Tossin. The Finalists will receive studio visits with second round jurors, who will ultimately select two artists as Awardees to receive $10,000 in unrestricted funds. The Finalists were selected by jurors Derrick Adams, artist, Brooklyn, NY; Zoe Larkins, Assistant Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, CO; and Selene Preciado, Independent Curator, Los Angeles, CA.

    Artadia’s jurying process provided the jurors with a unique opportunity to discover artists living in Los Angeles. Larkins noted, “The quality of applications was remarkable, and it was difficult to select only five finalists from the hundreds of applicants we considered. To be able to learn about so many artists with whom I wasn’t previously familiar was a great privilege. I look forward to getting to know their work better.” Preciado reflected on how the Artadia Awards process helped solidify her confidence in the artist community in LA: “It was a privilege to participate as a reviewer this year, and see the quality and multifariousness of talent in Los Angeles applicants. Los Angeles is a city of art and artists, and the process of reviewing so many applications did not only confirm this, but was also very invigorating as I was able to learn about the work of many artists that I was not aware of. I look forward to keep supporting and learning about their practice in the future.”

    Artadia received nearly 400 applications for the Awards, which were open to all visual artists living in Los Angeles County for over two years, working in any media, and at any stage of their career. Finalists and Artadia Award recipients are selected through Artadia’s rigorous, two-tier jury review process. In the first round of review, jurors evaluated the merit of all submissions and collaboratively determined the five Finalists. This is Artadia’s fourth Award cycle in Los Angeles.

    Artadia is a national non-profit organization that supports artists with unrestricted, meritbased Awards followed by a lifetime of program opportunities. Artadia is unique in that it allows any artist to apply, engages nationally recognized artists and curators to review work, and culminates in direct grants. Since 1999, Artadia has awarded over $3 million to more than 300 artists in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

    The 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awards are generously supported by GRoW @ Annenberg, Artadia’s Board of Directors, and Los Angeles Council members.

  • Application Now Open for the 2018 Los Angeles Artadia Awards

    1/2/18

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are open to all visual artists living and working throughout Los Angeles County. Individual artists and collaboratives working in all media, and at any stage in their career are strongly encouraged to apply. Artadia Awardees are selected through a two-tier jury process that combines local expertise with outside perspective from leading curators and artists. A preliminary panel will evaluate all online submissions and select five Finalists in February. A second panel will conduct studio visits with each Finalist, gaining a broader context for the artists’ work. Two Awardees will be selected from the Finalist pool to receive unrestricted Artadia Awards of $10,000. The 2018 Los Angeles Awardees will be announced in March.

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are:

    – Open to anyone living in Los Angeles County
    – Free of application fees and project outline requirements – Merit-based
    – Unrestricted

    Apply if you:

    – Have lived in Los Angeles for at least two years
    – Are not currently enrolled in an art-related degree program
    – Would like to have your work seen by a panel of prominent curators

    Application due
    January 31, 2018
    11:59 pm PST

    Apply Now!

  • Announcing the 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees

    3/14/17

    Artadia is pleased to announce the Awardees for the 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awards: Kahlil Joseph and Gala Porras-Kim. As the 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees, Joseph and Porras-kim will receive $10,000 in unrestricted funds as well as access to the ongoing benefits of the Artadia Awards program. This is Artadia’s third year providing unrestricted Awards to artists in Los Angeles. Applications for the Awards were open to any visual artist living in Los Angeles County, for over two years, working in all media and at any stage of their career.

    In the first round of jurying, Daniel Joseph Martinez, artist, Los Angeles, CA; Yesomi Umolu, Exhibitions Curator, Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago, IL; and Anuradha Vikram, Artistic Director, 18th Street Arts Center, Los Angeles, CA, selected five Finalists: Carmen Argote, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Kahlil Joseph, Gelare Khoshgozaran, and Gala Porras-Kim. Bennett Simpson, Senior Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, joined Vikram for the second round of evaluations. The jurors conducted studio visits with each of the five Finalists to determine the Awardees.

    Vikram extolled the ways in which Porras-Kim engages with cultural heritage and language in her practice: “Gala Porras-Kim is an artist in whose work a restorative vision of the future is not only envisioned but actively created. With extreme care and cultural sensitivity, Porras-Kim uses art’s speculative and imaginative powers to focus attention on real-world cultures and languages that have been neglected. Through her own process of learning about and understanding the value of these endangered ways of being, Porras-Kim’s artworks enhance the fields of archaeology, museology, and linguistics as well as contemporary art.” Of Joseph, Vikram stated: “Kahlil Joseph has one of the most distinctively original visual styles of any artist currently working in film. His hybrid practice crossing cinema, visual art, fashion, and popular music is sparking conversation far beyond the usual art circles. Whether his work takes the form of immersive gallery installations or more conventional single-channel cinema display, Joseph captures the arresting choreography of the contemporary street, which is both his setting and his sphere of influence.”

    Simpson highlighted how each Awardee uniquely captures the current zeitgeist: “It is an honor to award two such interesting and distinctive artists as Kahlil Joseph and Gala Porras-Kim. In a short time, Joseph has become one of the filmmakers people simply must pay attention to. His attention to choreography, sound, and cultural and community signifying—his particular poetics of blackness—is at home both in the museum and in the worlds of film and music. He is one of the indispensable voices of his moment. In a not-dissimilar manner, Porras-Kim brings an ethnopoetic interest in cultural heritage and translation to her many-layered installations. Her research acumen and politics allow histories to surface and merge with our moment.”

    The 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awards are made possible thanks to the generosity of Allison and Larry Berg, Artadia’s Board of Directors, Council members, and many individual donors in Los Angeles and throughout the United States.

    Image, from left to right: Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d., 2014, 35mm motion picture still (“Streetlight”), 1240 x 670 pixels; Gala Porras-Kim, For Learning Zapotec Verbs, 2012, wood, pencil, paper, wire, found rocks, 50 x 37.5 x 2.5 inches

  • Announcing the 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awards Finalists

    2/21/17

    Artadia is pleased to announce the five Finalists for the 2017 Los Angeles Awards: Carmen Argote, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Kahlil Joseph, Gelare Khoshgozaran, and Gala Porras-Kim. The Finalists will receive studio visits with second round jurors, who will ultimately select two artists as Awardees to receive $10,000 in unrestricted funds.

    The Finalists were selected by jurors Daniel Joseph Martinez, artist, Los Angeles, CA; Yesomi Umolu, Exhibitions Curator, Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago, IL; and Anuradha Vikram, Artistic Director, 18th Street Arts Center, Los Angeles, CA.

    Artadia’s jurying process provided the jurors with a unique opportunity to discover artists living in Los Angeles. Umolu said of the experience: “As a curator working outside of LA, it was invaluable to learn about the depth of artistic production in the city through the Artadia jury process. I am incredibly enthused to return to LA soon and to connect with its talented pool of artists.”

    Vikram reflected on how the Artadia Awards benefit LA artists and bridge connections between artists and curators: “Los Angeles is and has been an artist’s city, rather than an art market city. I am thrilled to be able to help provide the support our incredible artists need for their work, which often exists outside of approved compensation structures. Though we can only award two grants, I look forward to continuing to support the many talented artists whose work I discovered through this process.”

    Martinez noted the exposure to new artists that the Artadia’s process affords its jurors: “It is always exciting to be able to look at so many artists’ work and see the intellect and rigor of current artistic practice in Los Angeles. It was a privilege to be able to participate in the juror process and to work with an organization like Artadia.”

    This is Artadia’s third Award cycle in Los Angeles. Artadia received 500 applications for the Awards, which were open to all visual artists living in Los Angeles County for over two years, working in any media, and at any stage of their career. Finalists and Artadia Award recipients are selected through Artadia’s rigorous, two-tier jury review process. In the first round of review, jurors evaluated the merit of all submissions and collaboratively determined the five Finalists.

    Artadia is a national non-profit organization that supports artists with unrestricted, merit-based Awards followed by a lifetime of program opportunities. Artadia is unique in that it allows any artist to apply, engages nationally recognized artists and curators to review work, and culminates in direct grants. Since 1999, Artadia has awarded over $3 million to more than 300 artists in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

    The 2017 Los Angeles Artadia Awards are made possible thanks to the generosity of Allison and Larry Berg, Artadia’s Board of Directors, Council members, and many individual donors in Los Angeles and throughout the United States.

    Image, clockwise from left to right: Carmen Argote, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Gala Porras-Kim, and Kahlil Joseph.

  • Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles Summary by Diana Nawi

    2/3/17

    For Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles, Diana Nawi, Associate Curator, Pérez Art Museum Miami, traveled to Los Angeles to give a talk in conversation with Iman Issa at 356 S. Mission Rd. As a culmination of her participation in the program, Nawi presented a summary of her experience in the city. 

    I was delighted to have been invited by Artadia to visit Los Angeles to conduct studio visits with their awardees and participate in a public conversation hosted by 356 Mission. Los Angeles is a city close to my heart—I went to UCLA as an undergraduate and my time there was incredibly formative—and it was great to have the chance to return to connect in earnest with the constantly changing scene there.

    I found this trip particularly rewarding as I was able to meet artist who I didn’t know as well as reconnect with artists who I’ve been in conversation with for some time, a product of the breadth and diversity of artist’s with whom Artadia works. Over the course of three days I met with Max King Cap, Meg Cranston, Cayetano Ferrer, Mariah Garnett, Stanya Kahn, Robyn O’Neil, Melanie Schiff, and Kerry Tribe. My trip came on the heels of the election and many of the conversations I had were filtered through that lens and a sense of renewed urgency. It was an interesting moment to be in the studios of so many artists as they responded to their usual context (preparing for or coming off of exhibitions, working through new ideas and materials, teaching, etc.) as well as to this new national circumstance.

    My first two visits were with Tribe and Kahn. Having met with both artists about a year ago, it was great timing to pick up the conversation—seeing how previous projects and exhibitions had evolved and been realized, and having the chance to see new works in formation. Tribe and I discussed the work she had recently shown as part of the Current: LA Water, Exquisite Corpse (2016), which is 51-minute meditation on the 51 miles of the LA River. Comprised of original footage of the waterway and its nearby communities, the film touches on the ecology, sociology, and economy of the river and its surrounding environs, beautifully capturing the complexity of such a present but strangely overlooked site. Tribe was in the early stages of embarking on a newly commissioned piece, and it was really interesting to get a sense of how she determines and approaches her subject matter. Kahn had likewise recently finished new work for exhibitions and it was great to see not only the work itself, but discuss how she had approached installing these projects in gallery spaces. We also spent quite some time discussing a video work that is in progress; a really compelling piece that like much of her work taps into so much that is painfully, exquisitely personal and yet somehow collective.

    Likewise Mariah Garnett, whose film Full Burn (2014), included in Made in L.A. 2014 at the Hammer, was a real highlight for me, was very generous in discussing previous works and newly in formation projects. We watched a few of her older films together, talking about her process and in particular, the decisions that go into her own role within the works and into determining what is revealed to the viewer and what is withheld. Garnett’s work often seems to seek to understand its subject matter through the self, and it is both her and the viewer that thus become implicated in the works. It was really interesting to see how this focus shapes the formal concerns of her projects.

    Robyn O’Neil was deep in preparations for an exhibition that was right around the corner, and it was a great moment to be in the studio as she was working towards completing her labor-intensive, large-scale drawings. I appreciated being afforded insights into the actual processes that guide the work, as well spending time talking about her recent production and its relationship to this new body of work. Cayetano Ferrer was similarly preparing for an upcoming exhibition and it was great to speak with him about his materials and processes, both of which are so central to the conceptual underpinnings of his work. I had seen an excellent installation of his work in an exhibition at Miami’s Michael Jon and Alan and I was really pleased to be able to learn more about his practice through this visit.

    I’ve known Meg Cranston for many years, having studied with her at UCLA. Cranston’s classes remain a touchstone for me, both for the direct lessons she imparted but also in the way in which she, and many of the other UCLA faculty, modeled how to be an artist in the world. Her relationship to her subject matter and forms, which is wonderfully idiosyncratic and open, really exposed me to the way in which artists work and approach ideas. I was grateful for the chance to reconnect with Cranston at this moment, and in addition to looking at new work, much of our visit was spent discussing the election, the role of feminism in shaping the current conversation, and the arts education.

    My last two visits were with Melanie Schiff, whose work I knew in particular from my time in Chicago, and with Max King Cap, whose practice I was pleased to learn more about. Schiff had recently opened an exhibition in New York and it was great to see some of the work from the bodies that comprised that show, as well as to talk about her shooting and editing process. We also discussed her recent show at LAXART, which I was fortunate to see in person, and it was a great touchstone to discuss the way in which she conceptualizes exhibitions and installations. Cap was in the midst of a number of projects, both artistic and focused on arts education, and our conversation was very open, pivoting around both topics. I particularly enjoyed seeing his bold, graphic drawings and discussing ways in which they might circulate, as well as learning about his research into the successes and failures of art schools in the US.

    I invited Iman Issa to join me from New York after speaking with Ethan Swan at 356 Mission, who, like me, has been following her work for a few years now. I very much think of LA as a sculptor’s city and Issa’s practice offers a really interesting and pointedly political dimension to that conversation. I am grateful to Artadia and to Ethan and his team for supporting this program and for opening up the space for us to have this conversation, both literally and figuratively. I’m also grateful to Artadia for facilitating this trip and these visits, which were so productive. And lastly, I’m thankful to the artists with for opening their studios to me. I look forward to continuing the conversation.

    Image: Max King Cap, Dubois is Back in Town, 2014, ink on paper, 24 x 36 inches

  • Application Now Open for the 2017 Los Angeles Awards

    1/1/17

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are open to all visual artists living and working throughout Los Angeles County. Individual artists and collaboratives working in all media, and at any stage in their career are strongly encouraged to apply. Artadia Awardees are selected through a two-tier jury process that combines local expertise with outside perspective from leading curators and artists. A preliminary panel will evaluate all online submissions and select five Finalists in February. A second panel will conduct studio visits with each Finalist, gaining a broader context for the artists’ work. Two Awardees will be selected from the Finalist pool to receive unrestricted Artadia Awards of $10,000. The 2017 Los Angeles Awardees will be announced at the end of February.

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are:
    – Open to anyone living in Los Angeles County
    – Free of application fees and project outline requirements
    – Merit-based
    – Unrestricted

    Apply if you: 
    – Have lived in Los Angeles for at least two years
    – Are not currently enrolled in an art-related degree program
    – Would like to have your work seen by a panel of prominent curators

    Application due
    February 1, 2017
    Midnight PST

    Apply Now

     

  • Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles Public Program with Diana Nawi and Iman Issa at 356 Mission

    12/16/16

    Diana Nawi, Associate Curator, Pérez Art Museum Miami, was in conversation with artist Iman Issa at 356 S. Mission Rd. as part of Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles on Thursday, November 17 at 7:00 pm.

    Diana Nawi is Associate Curator at Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), where she has curated exhibitions including Adler Guerrier: Formulating a Plot, Iman Issa: Heritage Studies, and Nari Ward: Sun Splashed, a mid-career survey of the artist’s work. Nawi has organized newly commissioned projects with Yael Bartana, Nicole Cherubini, Bouchra Khalili, LOS JAICHACKERS (Julio César Morales and Eamon Ore-Giron), Shana Lutker, and Matthew Ronay. Prior to joining PAMM, Nawi worked as an assistant curator on the Abu Dhabi Project of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and served as a fellow at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. Nawi holds an MA from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles.

    Iman Issa (born 1979, Cairo) is an artist based in Cairo and New York. Recent group and solo exhibitions include the 8th Berlin Biennial, MuHKA, Antwerp, Tensta Konsthall, Spånga, New Museum, New York, KW Institute of Contemporary Art, Berlin, Sculpture Center, New York, and the Contemporary Image Collective in Cairo. Books include Thirty-three Stories about Reasonable Characters in Familiar Places published by the SculptureCenter in 2011. Awards include the HNFMACBA Award (2012) and the Abraaj Group Art Prize (2013). Issa teaches at the Cooper Union School of Art.

     

     

  • Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles Summary by Katherine Brinson

    8/8/16

    Katherine Brinson is Curator of Contemporary Art at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, where she recently curated a major retrospective of the work of Christopher Wool. Since joining the Guggenheim in 2005, Brinson has organized numerous exhibitions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin, including solo presentations by Danh Vo, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Agathe Snow, Ryan Gander, Kitty Kraus, and Julieta Aranda. In 2015 she co-curated The Hugo Boss Prize: Paul Chan and the group exhibition Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim, and was the curator of the Guggenheim presentation of Doris Salcedo (organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago).

    In November 2015, I traveled to Los Angeles as the visiting curator for Artadia’s Art & Dialogue series, a recently inaugurated program that aims to facilitate exchange between artists and curators across the country. I hadn’t had the chance to do many studio visits during my previous brief trips to the city, so this was a welcome opportunity to get to know new practices, as well as to deepen my insight into a number of L.A.-based artists I had long followed. My illuminating conversations with each awardee exceeded my high expectations, and while the work was resolutely diverse, I was interested to see that a number of connective threads emerged across an intense three days of visits—notably a common focus on the social fabric and natural landscape of California.

    My first visit was with Nicole Miller. Having seen her mesmeric video The Conductor as part of the Highline Art program in 2009, I knew that her work occupies a space between documentary film, storytelling, and performance, exploring the capacity of the moving image for perceptual disjunction as well as narrative. Our discussion ranged across phantom limb syndrome, laughter therapy, and the daggering dance style, with a particular focus on her recent work Believing is Seeing, a collection of oral histories from L.A. residents commissioned by LACMA. Later in the day, my visit with Kerry Tribe touched on some related concerns, particularly the instability of recalled narratives and cinematic representation. I had seen Kerry’s riveting three-channel video The Aphasia Poetry Club at her solo show at 356 S. Mission Road the previous spring, so we focused on a number of other past installations and film works, as well as her forthcoming public project based on the Los Angeles River.

    My conversation with Richard T. Walker, a fellow British transplant to the US, centered on the notion of the sublime and how it was parsed and amplified in his video, installation, and sound-based works. We viewed a work in which monologue, score, and tableaux of the southwest desert cohered into an eloquent exploration of the individual’s relationship to nature. In Melanie Schiff’s studio, I was excited to have the chance to see and discuss many of the photographs that had featured in her recent monograph at LAXART. Excavating the nuances of her domestic setting, the female body, and the quality of the Californian light, each of the images we viewed was quietly dense with meaning. I saw a similar consideration of the vicissitudes of the daily environment in the work of Ken Fandell, as we looked through a series of photographs that studied the cypress trees outside his living room window. Other subjects veered from the everyday to the cosmic, and a favorite memory from this visit was a series of witty collages created by merging cuttings from various books of canonic photography.

    Allison Wiese is based in San Diego, where she Chairs the Department of Art at USD, so we met at a café to discuss her wide-ranging practice. We focused on a number of projects that activate and intervene in architectural spaces in performative ways, including some ambitious works in progress. My final visit was with the sole painter in the group of awardees: Nick Brown. Brown’s densely layered canvases take as their subject the forests and abandoned settlements that can be found in surprisingly close proximity to the city. Interestingly, these paintings were as immersive as any of the installation or time-based work I saw during other visits, with fragments of the compositions at times advancing beyond the conventional bounds of the canvas toward the viewer, in a merging of the pictorial and physical space—a bracing revelation rounding off a few days that had been full of them.

    Image: Richard T. Walker

  • Announcing the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees

    3/21/16

    New York, NY – Artadia is pleased to announce the Awardees for the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards: Dan Finsel and Mariah Garnett. The 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees will receive $10,000 in unrestricted funds as well as access to the ongoing benefits of the Artadia Awards program. This is Artadia’s second year providing unrestricted Awards to artists in Los Angeles. Applications for the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards were open to any visual artist living in Los Angeles County, CA for over two years, working in all media and at any stage of their career.

    In the first round of evaluations, Jarrett Gregory, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA and Mark Beasley, Curator at Performa, New York, NY selected five finalists from 684 submissions. Kris Kuramitsu, Deputy Director and Senior Curator, The Mistake Room, Los Angeles, CA joined Gregory for the second round of evaluations. The jurors conducted studio visits with each of the five finalists to determine the Awardees.

    Jarrett Gregory emphasized the depth of each Awardee’s practice: “Both Mariah Garnett and Dan Finsel address the complexities of personal identity in unexpected and completely different ways. For Dan this involves acting theory and therapy; for Mariah, research and reenactment. This notion of the self as a malleable and unpredictable entity felt especially relevant to us within the landscape of Los Angeles as well as in the year 2016. Dan’s work called to mind the early experiments of Paul McCarthy or Chris Burden but with a decidedly Feminist approach to the body. Mariah’s strategy for filmmaking is thoughtful and effortless even in it’s layered complexity. She addresses gender and identity in a way that liberates these subjects while bringing them into the present moment with a fresh perspective.”

    Kris Kuramitsu also extolled the work of each artist: “It is such a privilege to be able to recognize Mariah Garnett and Dan Finsel with the Los Angeles Artadia Award. Mariah Garnett tells powerful, personal stories in a visually and conceptually compelling way; her videos and installations are as much a pleasure to experience as they are affecting. Dan Finsel’s strange, complex videos, drawings and sculptures offer a glimpse of the psychological and social machinations that comprise our identities. He plumbs the often fraught relationship we have with our own bodies to create work that echoes in the mind long after you leave the gallery.”

    The 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees will be eligible for the inaugural National Artadia Award to be presented at the end of 2016. Additionally, starting in 2017, Artadia will run grant cycles in each of its program cities every year. Through Annual Award cycles and the introduction of a National Award, Artadia will provide even more exceptional artists across the U.S. with consistent support.

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are made possible by Artadia’s dedicated Board of Directors, Council members, and many generous individuals throughout the country.

  • Announcing the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards Finalists

    3/3/16

    Artadia is pleased to announce the five finalists for the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards. The finalists were selected by jurors Jarrett Gregory, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA and Mark Beasley, Curator at Performa, New York, NY following a review of 684 applicants in late February.

    The five finalists for the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards are:

    Rafa Esparza

    Dan Finsel

    Mariah Garnett

    Dylan Mira

    Nate Page

    Of the finalists, Jarrett Gregory said, “We were excited by an overwhelming number of the applications but in the end I believe the finalists represent a diverse range of voices and reflect Mark’s and my interest in work that expands into video, performance, and other constructed situations. I can’t wait to visit the finalists.” Mark Beasley also spoke to the impressive submission pool: “The number and quality of applicants is testament to Artadia’s clear standing in the arts community and the need for the support they provide in terms of exposure for the visual arts in a time where attention of any kind is at a premium.”

    This is Artadia’s second year providing unrestricted Awards to artists in Los Angeles. Applications for the 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards were open to visual artists living in Los Angeles County, CA for over two years, working in all media and at any stage of their career. Artadia selects finalists and Artadia Award recipients through a rigorous two-part jury review process. In the first round of review, two renowned curators evaluate the merit of all submissions received and collaboratively determine five finalists. Artadia’s selection process is highly recognized and provides all applicants with the opportunity for their work to be viewed by a prominent curator. Beasley noted that this process benefits the jurors as well, stating, “It’s inspiring to be reminded of the range of art and artists out there, and that places such as Artadia are there to hear the call and support new, illuminating and often difficult thought!”

    Gregory will be joined by Kris Kuramitsu, Deputy Director and Senior Curator, The Mistake Room, Los Angeles, CA to conduct studio visits with the five finalists in early March and select two artists as Awardees. The 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awardees will each receive up to $10,000 in unrestricted funds as well as access to the ongoing benefits of the Artadia Awards program.

    This Award cycle marks a momentous change for the organization. Beginning in 2017, Artadia will present Awards in Los Angeles and each of its program cities every year. Annual Awards will offer artists greater opportunities for funds and recognition, and will enable Artadia to strengthen its connections within arts communities across the country.

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are made possible by Artadia’s dedicated Board of Directors, Council members, and many generous individuals throughout the country.

  • 2016 Los Angeles Artadia Awards

    1/1/16

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    Los Angeles Artadia Awards are open to all visual artists living and working throughout Los Angeles County. Individual artists and collaboratives working in all media, and at any stage in their career are strongly encouraged to apply. Artadia Awardees are selected through a two- tiered jury process that combines local expertise with outside perspective from leading curators and artists. A preliminary panel will evaluate all online submissions and select five finalists in February. A second panel will conduct studio visits with each finalist, gaining a broader context for the artists’ work. Awardees will be selected from the finalist pool to receive unrestricted Artadia Awards of up to $10,000. The 2016 Los Angeles Awardees will be announced in early March and are eligible for the inaugural national Artadia Award.

    The Los Angeles Artadia Awards are:

    – Open to anyone living in Los Angeles County
    – Free of application fees and project outline requirements – Merit-based
    – Unrestricted

    Apply If You:

    – Have lived in Los Angeles for two years or longer
    – Are not currently enrolled in an art-related degree program
    – Would like to have your work seen by a panel of prominent curators

    For the online application, please visit:

    artadia.submittable.com

    Application Deadline:

    February 15, 2016 by 6:00 PM (PST)

     

     

  • Art & Dialogue: Los Angeles Public Program Katherine Brinson in Conversation with Alex Hubbard at LACMA

    12/16/15

    Presented at Los Angeles County Museum of Art as part of Artadia’s Art & Dialogue program, Katherine Brinson engages in a conversation with artist Alex Hubbard. In addition to providing an overview of Hubbard’s practice, this talk focuses on work presented in Hubbard’s exhibition “Basic Perversions,” which was concurrently on view as the inaugural exhibition at Maccarone, Los Angeles.

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    Katherine Brinson is Curator of Contemporary Art at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, where she recently curated a major retrospective of the work of Christopher Wool. Since joining the Guggenheim in 2005, Brinson has organized numerous exhibitions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin, including solo presentations by Danh Vo, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Agathe Snow, Ryan Gander, Kitty Kraus, and Julieta Aranda. In 2015 she co-curated The Hugo Boss Prize: Paul Chan and the group exhibition Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim, and was the curator of the Guggenheim presentation of Doris Salcedo (organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago).

    Los Angeles-based artist Alex Hubbard was born in 1975 in Toledo, Oregon. He received his BFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art and participated in the Whitney Independent Study Program. Working across painting, sculpture, and video, Hubbard often blurs the distinctions between mediums by migrating the rules of one over to the next. One-person shows of Hubbard’s work have been presented at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Midway Contemporary Art Center, Minneapolis; The Kitchen, New York; and the Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA. His work has been featured in numerous group exhibitions, including the 2010 Whitney Biennial; Greater New York at MoMA PS1; and at the Hessel Museum of Art at CCS Bard; Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Miami; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; and Palais de Tokyo, Paris. Hubbard’s work appears in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, NY; the Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, NY; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Hubbard’s first monograph, “Eat Your Friends,” was published this year by DoPe Press.

  • And the Award Goes to…: The 2013 Artadia Los Angeles Award Winners

    1/22/14

    And the Award Goes to…: The 2013 Artadia Los Angeles Award Winners
    January 22 – February 23, 2014 

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    L.A.C.E. is pleased to announce 2013 Artadia Los Angeles Award Exhibition: And the Award Goes to… The exhibition will celebrate the work and achievements of the five Artadia Awardees from Los Angeles: Cayetano Ferrer, Vishal Jugdeo, Nicole Miller, Stanya Kahn and Kerry Tribe. And the Award Goes to… also commemorates Artadia’s first grant cycle in Los Angeles.

     

    Chosen based on of the merit of their work, the five 2013 Artadia Los Angeles Awardees Cayetano Ferrer, Vishal Jugdeo, Nicole Miller, Stanya Kahn and Kerry Tribe reflect a varied set of interests relevant to our contemporary cultural conditions. The exhibition And the Award Goes to…, teases out semblances between the five artists’ disparate practices, to examine how each artists uses materials to negotiate the terrain between fiction and reality. Cayetano Ferrer employs mimicry, artifice, and illusion as techniques that integrate into thematic content alongside the historical residue of the context, objects, or materials. Vishal Jugdeo collaborates with professional and non-professional actors to construct fictional situations, rooted in dialogue, that are both abstractions and representations of everyday relations. Nicole Miller uses cinema to explore subjective realities, renegotiating memories alongside filmic documents to find moments of traumatic ataxia, which she directs toward catharsis through intense subjectivity. In a long-term investigation of how rhetoric gains and loses power, Stanya Kahn allows a diverse flow of structural influences, understanding that what the body does can bear a load similar and yet different from what the body says. Kerry Tribe explores themes of memory, subjectivity and doubt, often by combining fictional and documentary approaches.

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    The 2013 Artadia Los Angeles Awardees were selected by leading curators: Ali Subotnick (Curator, Hammer Museum UCLA, Los Angeles), Joao Ribas (formerly of MIT’s List Visual Art Center, Cambridge) and Magnolia de la Garza (Associate Curator, Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City) after conducting studio visits with ten finalists in Los Angeles in November 2013. The ten finalists were selected from over 500 applications by jurors Ali Subotnick, Chus Martinez (El Museo del Barrio, New York) and artist Spencer Finch (New York) who reviewed all applications at Artadia’s headquarters in Brooklyn, NY.

    To honor the generous gifts of the Artadia Los Angeles Council, Cayetano Ferrer and Kerry Tribe were named Los Angeles Council Awardees.

    About LACE:

    LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions) both champions and challenges the art of our time by fostering artists who innovate, explore, and risk.  We move within and beyond our four walls to provide opportunities for diverse publics to engage deeply with contemporary art.  In doing so, we further dialogue and participation between and among artists and those audiences.

    Founded in 1978 by a small group of artists, LACE has become an internationally recognized pioneer among art institutions. Uniquely positioned among commercial galleries and major art establishments, our nonprofit organization provides a local venue that advocates and exhibits innovations in art-making.  By encouraging experimentation, LACE has nurtured not only several generations of young artists, but also newly emerging art forms such as performance art, video art, digital art, and installation-based work. LACE has presented the work of over 5,000 artists in over 3,000 programs and events, which have provided the impetus for dialogue about contemporary arts and culture for over 30 years.

     

  • Announcing the 2013 Artadia Awards Los Angeles Finalists

    10/17/13

    OCTOBER 17, 2013

    SHORT-LIST OF 10 FINALISTS FOR ARTADIA AWARDS 2013 LOS ANGELES

    The exceptional range of artists living and working in Los Angeles was evident as three prominent panelists selected the 10 finalists for the Artadia Awards 2013 Los Angeles. Panelists Ali Subotnick, Curator of The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Chus Martinez, Chief Curator of El Museo del Barrio, New York; and Spencer Finch, Artist, New York; determined the list of finalists after over 500 applications received for the first cycle of Artadia Awards in Los Angeles.

    The 10 Finalists for the Artadia Awards 2013 Los Angeles are: Zackary Drucker, Cayetano Ferrer, Kim Fisher, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Vishal Jugdeo, Stanya Kahn, Nicole Miller, Michele O’Marah, Aaron Sandnes and Kerry Tribe.

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  • Artadia Awards Launch in Los Angeles

    5/1/13

    Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue is pleased to announce the launch of the Artadia Awards in the metropolitan Los Angeles area. Artadia has partnered with local foundations and private patrons of the arts who recognize the importance of unrestricted funding to visual artists at the local level. Los Angeles is the sixth city in Artadia’s national awards program.
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